Matthews v. A Forever Recovery

Back in 2009, professional mental health counselor, Keith Matthews of Battle Creek, MI, sued his former employer, A Forever Recovery, for violations of the Michigan Whistleblower's Protection Act in retaliation for his filing of a civil right violations complaint with Michigan state. Through this lawsuit, Matthews won a judgement against AFR for this violation of the Michigan Whistleblower's Protection Act. More details on the page.

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Do patient suspensions generate more revenue for Narconon?

This single Mom took out a high interest loan and emptied her retirement account to pay for her son's treatment at Narconon Stone Hawk. She was disappointed to find the facility in poor condition. Additionally, she claims her son was dropped off at a motel, 26 miles away from the program in a drug infested area. She feels that Narconon uses suspensions to generate revenue by charging additional fees when clients relapse.

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12 Days at Narconon StoneHawk in Battle Creek, No Refund, $28,600.00 Lost

The family member was at Narconon Stone Hawk in Battle Creek for 12 days, before being removed by the family after they discovered that the facility was inadequately cared for, the staff was unqualified, and the treatment methods were Scientology based. They tried for 9 months to get a refund, but calls were ignored and a certified letter to the Executive Director (Per Wickstrom) was returned unopened. The 12-day stay cost them $28,600.00.

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Nurse is “hurt” she was taken by Narconon Stone Hawk

A leaking roof, filthy mattresses and alcohol and drugs at the facility are some of the issues cited in this complaint. Mom is a nurse who inquired about the dosages of vitamins given to her son. Narconon staff members were either unable or unwilling to provide the information. Included in the complaint is another claim that Narconon was paid twice, once by the parent and once by the insurance company. When Mom asked for reimbursement by Narconon, they allegedly refused. This parent has filed complaints with multiple state agencies and Anthem Blue Cross, her health plan.

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Mom reads contract and swiftly pulls daughter from Narconon Stone Hawk

According to this Mom, there is no contractual basis for Narconon Stone Hawk to retain the $29, 437 fee she paid for her daughter's treatment. After receiving the contractual agreement, she pulled her daughter from the program and disputed the charge with her credit card company. Emails and calls to Narconon Stone Hawk went unanswered until a treasurer said she would help, but never followed up.

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Former client reports poor treatment, reimbursement withheld at Narconon Stone Hawk

As many others have alleged, this client reports relapsing counselors, sexual misconduct of staff and refusal of medical treatment during his treatment at Narconon Stone Hawk in 2006. In an effort to obtain reimbursement for a family member's up-front payment of $24, 900, claims were submitted by the client to his/her health plan. The health plan submitted $8,000 directly to Narconon. When attempting to get the money back, he/she was informed a processing fee of $399.00 would be required. As of December of 2007, no reimbursement had been received.

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Another Stone Hawk Rip Off, Angry in Ohio

This person was initially overwhelmed by the cost of Narconon, but along with the promised 70% success rate, counseling, a "magic sauna treatment", and a no drug detox, the 4-6 month stay seemed just like what the son needed. Once they agreed to have the son start the following week , they were pressured and told that if the son didn't start immediately, he could relapse, or die. They were required to put down a $5,000 deposit to hold a bed. When they arrived at Narconon with the son, the family was taken into a locked room, shown the student rules, the contract, and informed that if the son left after 2 weeks, regardless of the reason, the cost would be $15,000, with an additional $1000 per day after the two week period. They were also required to deposit another $500 into an emergency medical account and some money in the son's personal student account. They had a bad feeling about it at the time, but hoped that Narconon would be an answer to their prayers for the son. It only went downhill from there. Read the complaints for more.

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