Prevec v. Narconon Freedom Center; ABLE; Narconon EUS; Narconon Int; et. al.

In this case, the plaintiff's allege, breach of contract, breach of implied covenant of good faith and fair dealing, consumer fraud, deceptive trade practices, among other claims. According to the Prevec family, Narconon Freedom Center's intake counselor, Donald Michalski, assured them of the program's 70% success rate. Janette Prevec was urged to make payment of $25,000 to NFC for her daughter's treatment by taking out two credit cards. Michalski assured Mrs. Prevec that she could pay off the cards when her health insurance reimbursed her for the entire cost of the program. After arriving at the center, plaintiffs met with Michalski and noticed some L. Ron Hubbard literature. When asked if the Narconon program was affiliated with Scientology, Michalski denied the connection. Additionally, the plaintiffs claim that Lauren Prevec was placed in detox without a medical assessment where her antidepressant was completely discontinued.

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Narconon Freedom Center, Dept. of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs, January 5, 2015

Complaint allegations include misdiagnosis of acne and antibiotic treatment for actual diagnosis scabies, double billing client and insurance for detox without refund to client, and improper staffing. Violations substantiated: Not in compliance with requirements for data about relapse rates after program completion, or an annual evaluation progress report with measurable goals and objectives per R325.14113.

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Guidotti v. Narconon Gulf Coast, Inc.; Blu by the Sea, LLC; ABLE; Narconon Int.; Narconon EUS; et. al

The plaintiff in this case (Lucy Guidotti) found the website www.gulfcoastdrugrehab.com while conducting an internet search for an alcohol and drug rehab. She alleges this website was for Defendant Narconon Gulf Coast Rehab, although the website advertised the facility only as “Gulf Coast Addiction Treatment” and made no mention of Narconon. The website advertised a 90% success rate, a sauna program that reduced or eliminated drug cravings, individualized treatment, and cognitive behavioral therapy. Lucy called the number listed on the website and spoke to Deborah Ross who reiterated what was advertised on the website, but added that the facility had highly trained psychiatric specialists, a cure for panic attacks, and medical supervision at all times. Lucy paid $40,000 and entered treatment at Narconon Gulf Coast. After starting the program, Lucy claims she saw no highly trained psychiatric specialists, received no continuous medical supervision or cognitive behavioral therapy, and her panic attacks worsened. In fact, she left the program due to medical problems experienced during the sauna portion of the program. The plaintiff makes claims for relief under Civil RICO for Mail and Wire Fraud, Breach of Oral Contract, Fraudulent Misrepresentation, Florida Unfair and Deceptive Trade Practices Act, Misleading Advertising, Negligence, and Unjust Enrichment.

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Police Log, Narconon Colorado, December 15, 2014

Someone called the police from Narconon Colorado. On call back, a busy signal or no answer was received. A police officer was dispatched and the call was determined to be a likely misdial. Interestingly, the police report mentions that phone time at Narconon is monitored.

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Police Records, Narconon Arrowhead, October 26, 2014

This police report involves items allegedly stolen from a client while he was away on medical leave. Narconon Arrowhead's Senior Director of Public Relations, Robert Newsmith, presented the police with copies of paperwork signed by the client stating that Narconon could not be held responsible for lost or stolen items. At this point, the police informed both parties that this was a civil issue due to the contractual agreement.

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Vairo v. Narconon Fresh Start d/b/a A Life Worth Saving, Inc; ABLE; Narconon Int. Narconon WUS

Through a 1-800 referral number, plaintiff Ken E. Vairo was recommended Narconon as a drug treatment program with the highest success rate for his son, Ken, Jr. Ken, Sr. was put in contact with Dan Carmichael who made several false representations about the success rate, benefits of the sauna and extensive addiction counseling provided by certified and licensed professionals, including medical personnel, he claims. Mr. Vairo paid $31,000 for the Narconon program, but alleges his son received no counseling for his addiction. Instead, he claims, his son was given scientology training routines and no medical oversight. The plaintiffs make claims for damages under federal wiretap violations, breach of contract, fraud, fraudulent concealment, negligence, intentional infliction of emotional distress, negligent misrepresentation, claims under the Colorado Consumer Protection Act, unjust enrichment and negligent infliction of emotional distress.

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Henning and Tetreau v. Narconon Fresh Start, Sunshine Summit Lodge, ABLE, Narconon Int., Narconon WUS, et. al.

In January 2014, while searching for a rehabilitation facility for her daughter, Deanna Tetreau of Michigan came across a website that purported to be an independent referral service which was not independent from Narconon at all. From there, she was referred to a Narconon Fresh Start representative named Josh Penn, infamous now for making representations that the Narconon program provided drug counseling under the supervision of medical professionals, and that it was a scientifically proven method resulting in a success rate of over 70%. Plaintiffs signed the contract, paid for their Warner Springs location program called Sunshine Summit Lodge where Deanna's daughter Jennifer Henning began 'treatment' only to find that there was no counseling, only Scientology training. She was unable to complete the sauna component due to high doses Niacin triggering pancreatitis which the facility neglected to provide appropriate can and supervision of. The causes of action in this case are: Breach of Contract; Negligence; Fraud; Negligent Misrepresentation; Violations of non-competition law , violation of federal wiretapping, law among others.

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Martin v. Narconon Fresh Start d/b/a Rainbow Canyon Retreat; ABLE; Narconon West US; Narconon International; et. al.

Fresh Start representative Dan Carmichael made the usual false representations to the Plaintiffs (76% success rate, licensed medical care at the facility, the program is secular, and the sauna detox scientifically proven and effective for eliminating drug cravings) and also recommended that Plaintiffs employ Kevin Ray d/b/a Second Wind Intervention as an interventionist. This complaint goes into detail about the use of telephone scripts which are used with callers, in order to manipulate callers into enrolling their loved one in Fresh Start. It also goes into detail about how phone calls are recorded without the caller's knowledge, and used as "a means of teaching the high pressure and deceptive sales techniques Fresh Start uses."

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