Mowery v. Narconon of Northern California d/b/a Redwood Cliffs; ABLE; Narconon International; et. al.

After undergoing a non-medically supervised sauna and vitamin detox, being made to study Scientology materials which had no apparent connection to substance abuse treatment, Jered became extremely scared by the “treatment” he was receiving and the fact that there appeared to be no qualified personnel at Narconon, and pretended to have a family emergency in order to escape from Narconon. The claims in this lawsuit are for Breach of Contract; Fraud; Negligence; Intentional Infliction of Emotional Distress; Civil RICO for Mail and Wire Fraud, 18 U.S.C. § 1964(c); Injunctive Relief Under California Unfair Competition Act, Cal. Bus. & Prof. Code § 17203; Negligent Misrepresentation; Breach of Implied Covenant of Good Faith and Fair Dealing; and Negligence per se.

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Matthys and Phillips v. Narconon Fresh Start d/b/a A Life Worth Saving, Inc; ABLE; Narconon International

Narconon Fresh Start Employees Bryan Randall and Matt Kinser falsely represented the Narconon Program as having a 75% success rate, that religion is not a part of the program, that Tyler would be under the care of a doctor or nurse at Fresh Start, that the sauna would be medically supervised, and that at least 50% of the cost of the program would be covered by Tyler’s health insurance. This lawsuit includes claims for: Breach of Contract; Fraud; Fraudulent Concealment; Negligence; Intentional Infliction of Emotional Distress; Negligent Misrepresentation; Claim Under Colorado Consumer Protection Act, C.R.S.A. § 6-1-105; and Civil RICO for Mail and Wire Fraud, 18 U.S.C. § 1964(c).

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Mott v. Narconon Fresh Start d/b/a A Life Worth Saving, Inc.; ABLE; Narconon International

Nikki was seen by a doctor the day she arrived at Narconon, but there was no other medical supervision (doctor or nurse) during withdrawal or during the rest of her stay at Narconon in Colorado. She was taken off an anti-depressant medication which was prescribed by her own personal doctor, and which she had been taking for 10 years, by Narconon. This lawsuit includes claims for: Breach of Contract; Fraud; Fraudulent Concealment; Negligence; Intentional Infliction of Emotional Distress; Negligent Misrepresentation; Claim Under Colorado Consumer Protection Act, C.R.S.A. § 6-1-105; and Civil RICO for Mail and Wire Fraud, 18 U.S.C. § 1964(c).

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FTC Complaint, Narconon Warner Springs, April 24, 2014

Parents sent 18 yr old child to Narconon based upon the false claims made by a person from a rehab referral site, a parent of a graduate he referred her to, as well as those made by the intake staff. Daughter ran away after 2 weeks. Felt harassed by 'bull-baiting' and believed she was being brainwashed by Scientology. Parents learned the whole program is Scientology and that the guy who referred her had died from a heroin over-dose after referring her to Fresh Start. Wants partial refund.

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Geanacopulos v. Narconon Fresh Start d/b/a Rainbow Canyon Retreat, et. al.

Peter Geanacopulos began to experience heart palpitations during the sauna portion of the Narconon program, and was taken to see a doctor in Caliente, Nevada. The doctor said that he believed the palpitations were the result of the high doses of Niacin given as a part of the program, and recommended drastically reducing the Niacin or stopping it altogether. This was stated in the presence of a Narconon employee. When Peter returned to Narconon, had Peter continue the high doses of Niacin. Peter was removed from Narconon by his mother, but continues to have heart palpitations and remains under the care of a cardiologist. Causes of action in this lawsuit are: Breach of Contract, Fraud, Negligence, Intentional Infliction of Emotional Distress, Negligent Misrepresentation (in the alternative), and Negligence per se.

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Narconon Survey Response #321

This survey respondent lost her sister to addiction at the age of 39. She claims that her sister did not receive the treatment she badly needed. While under the care of Narconon, her sister was discovered in a bar parking lot using cocaine. On confrontation about the incident, Narconon's response was that clients were allowed some freedom.

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Narconon Survey Response #317

This former client would like to prevent others from being scammed by Narconon. She claims that Narconon had no qualified staff while she was there; a physician had to google information about high blood pressure and did nothing. She was lied to, but ultimately was motivated by her circumstances to get clean after leaving Narconon.

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Narconon Survey Response #320

This survey respondent claims he was referred to Narconon by Tom Cruise. The program had no medical supervision while he was there, but he was offered the special "Cruise module." He felt bamboozled after realizing the program was scientology, and later relapsed. He eventually went through an accredited program with medical supervision and got clean. He is no longer is in touch with Cruise, who he believes is in need of psychological help or an intervention to get out of scientology.

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Estrada and Chavez v. Narconon Fresh Start d/b/a Sunshine Summit Lodge, et. al.

After filling out a form on a website that purported to find an appropriate drug rehab facility, Plaintiff was contacted by a Narconon representative named Ryan (1-866-635-7437) who pressured to send her son to Narconon. Another Narconon representative, Josh Penn, joined the call and also pressured Christy to send her son to Narconon, suggesting that he might die if he didn't go to Narconon. Within a short while, she had received 3 phone calls from Ryan and Josh Penn, urging her to get her son into Narconon "today". Once at Narconon, the staff repeatedly told Branden that his family had not called and did not care about him, when, in fact, the family had called every day, worried. During a visit by his aunt and uncle, they became aware that Narconon was Scientology and not drug treatment, and took him out of Narconon. Causes of action in this case are: Breach of Contract; Fraud; and Negligence.

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Amato v. Narconon Fresh Start d/b/a Sunshine Summit Lodge, et. al.

Angelo, a martial arts fighter who had become addicted to Vicodin after 3 surgeries, was frightened by signs of psychosis in fellow patients who had been taken off their medications by Narconon. On one occasion, he was attacked from behind by one of the students in front of a Narconon "counselor" who did nothing, not even reprimand, the student. Angelo left Narconon because he did not feel safe, and the staff were unfit to treat him. Claims in this lawsuit are: Breach of Contract; Fraud; and Negligence.

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