Currey v. Narconon Freedom Center; ABLE; Narconon EUS; Narconon Int.; et. al.

The plaintiff in this case alleges breach of contract, breach of implied covenant of good faith and fair dealing, and consumer fraud. Despite promises to the contrary, Narconon Freedom Center failed to acquire preauthorization for the client's stay or to provide a physical exam. Other complaints include deceptive advertising and false representations about the program's success rates.

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McHenry v. Narconon Louisiana New Life Retreat; ABLE; Narconon EUS; Narconon Int.; et.al

The plaintiff in this case alleges that she found Narconon New Life Retreat (Narconon NLR) through an internet search that turned up www.non12-steprehabs.org. There she found a 1-800# and got connected to Lance at a fake referral service. Lance described himself as an 'independent' volunteer drug counselor and referred the plaintiff to Jeff Gordon at Narconon NLR.The usual bait and switch ensued. Plaintiff alleges she was promised a 76% success rate and extensive addiction counseling for her son. Instead, she claims, her son received Scientology doctrine and practices for which she paid $27,000. Note: NOTICE of Voluntary Dismissal by Jeannette McHenry (Pendley, Patrick) (Entered: 03/11/2015)

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Prevec v. Narconon Freedom Center; ABLE; Narconon EUS; Narconon Int; et. al.

In this case, the plaintiff's allege, breach of contract, breach of implied covenant of good faith and fair dealing, consumer fraud, deceptive trade practices, among other claims. According to the Prevec family, Narconon Freedom Center's intake counselor, Donald Michalski, assured them of the program's 70% success rate. Janette Prevec was urged to make payment of $25,000 to NFC for her daughter's treatment by taking out two credit cards. Michalski assured Mrs. Prevec that she could pay off the cards when her health insurance reimbursed her for the entire cost of the program. After arriving at the center, plaintiffs met with Michalski and noticed some L. Ron Hubbard literature. When asked if the Narconon program was affiliated with Scientology, Michalski denied the connection. Additionally, the plaintiffs claim that Lauren Prevec was placed in detox without a medical assessment where her antidepressant was completely discontinued.

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Guidotti v. Narconon Gulf Coast, Inc.; Blu by the Sea, LLC; ABLE; Narconon Int.; Narconon EUS; et. al

The plaintiff in this case (Lucy Guidotti) found the website www.gulfcoastdrugrehab.com while conducting an internet search for an alcohol and drug rehab. She alleges this website was for Defendant Narconon Gulf Coast Rehab, although the website advertised the facility only as “Gulf Coast Addiction Treatment” and made no mention of Narconon. The website advertised a 90% success rate, a sauna program that reduced or eliminated drug cravings, individualized treatment, and cognitive behavioral therapy. Lucy called the number listed on the website and spoke to Deborah Ross who reiterated what was advertised on the website, but added that the facility had highly trained psychiatric specialists, a cure for panic attacks, and medical supervision at all times. Lucy paid $40,000 and entered treatment at Narconon Gulf Coast. After starting the program, Lucy claims she saw no highly trained psychiatric specialists, received no continuous medical supervision or cognitive behavioral therapy, and her panic attacks worsened. In fact, she left the program due to medical problems experienced during the sauna portion of the program. The plaintiff makes claims for relief under Civil RICO for Mail and Wire Fraud, Breach of Oral Contract, Fraudulent Misrepresentation, Florida Unfair and Deceptive Trade Practices Act, Misleading Advertising, Negligence, and Unjust Enrichment.

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NAFC v. Narconon and Church of Scientology (many defendants)

Plaintiff National Association of Forensic Counselors, Inc. (NAFC) and Plaintiff American Academy of Certified Forensic Counselors, Inc. d/b/a American College of Certified Forensic Counselors (ACCFC) are issuing bodies for certifications in the rehab field, including Certified Chemical Dependency Counselor (CCDC), Master Addictions Counselor (MAC), and others. After finding that numerous Narconon and Scientology related entities and persons were (and are) using their certifications and trademarks without authorization, they have filed a lawsuit in Federal Court seeking to reclaim damages resulting from loss of reputation and money, which resulted in financial enrichment of the 82 defendants, and have asked for an injunction to prevent use in the future. The use of the trademarks implies that the individuals are certified by the Plaintiffs when in fact they are not. This case may have far reaching repercussions on other cases against Narconon.

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Hanchett v. Narconon of Georgia

In this lawsuit, Barry and Cyndy Hanchett allege Narconon of Georgia misrepresented the Narconon program, facility amenities, and insurance billing practices. In addition, when the notice of the lawsuit was sent to the Registered Agent, Attorney Matthew Hines, he was not at the location documented with the Secretary of State and could not be found.

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