Florida

Guidotti v. Narconon Gulf Coast, Inc.; Blu by the Sea, LLC; ABLE; Narconon Int.; Narconon EUS; et. al

The plaintiff in this case (Lucy Guidotti) found the website www.gulfcoastdrugrehab.com while conducting an internet search for an alcohol and drug rehab. She alleges this website was for Defendant Narconon Gulf Coast Rehab, although the website advertised the facility only as “Gulf Coast Addiction Treatment” and made no mention of Narconon. The website advertised a 90% success rate, a sauna program that reduced or eliminated drug cravings, individualized treatment, and cognitive behavioral therapy. Lucy called the number listed on the website and spoke to Deborah Ross who reiterated what was advertised on the website, but added that the facility had highly trained psychiatric specialists, a cure for panic attacks, and medical supervision at all times. Lucy paid $40,000 and entered treatment at Narconon Gulf Coast. After starting the program, Lucy claims she saw no highly trained psychiatric specialists, received no continuous medical supervision or cognitive behavioral therapy, and her panic attacks worsened. In fact, she left the program due to medical problems experienced during the sauna portion of the program. The plaintiff makes claims for relief under Civil RICO for Mail and Wire Fraud, Breach of Oral Contract, Fraudulent Misrepresentation, Florida Unfair and Deceptive Trade Practices Act, Misleading Advertising, Negligence, and Unjust Enrichment.

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NAFC v. Narconon and Church of Scientology (many defendants)

Plaintiff National Association of Forensic Counselors, Inc. (NAFC) and Plaintiff American Academy of Certified Forensic Counselors, Inc. d/b/a American College of Certified Forensic Counselors (ACCFC) are issuing bodies for certifications in the rehab field, including Certified Chemical Dependency Counselor (CCDC), Master Addictions Counselor (MAC), and others. After finding that numerous Narconon and Scientology related entities and persons were (and are) using their certifications and trademarks without authorization, they have filed a lawsuit in Federal Court seeking to reclaim damages resulting from loss of reputation and money, which resulted in financial enrichment of the 82 defendants, and have asked for an injunction to prevent use in the future. The use of the trademarks implies that the individuals are certified by the Plaintiffs when in fact they are not. This case may have far reaching repercussions on other cases against Narconon.

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Penta v. Narconon Gulf Coast, Deborah Ross

Parents of the late Dominic Penta, Jr. were falsely promised that their ill and seriously addicted adult son would be attending a medically accepted addiction treatment program, that he would receive personalized psychotherapy sessions with a licensed mental health counselor, that they would receive weekly phone updates, and that the facility had a full-time physician on staff and on the premises to care for him. When Dominic was wrongfully terminated from the program and banished to a hotel without funds or capacity to care for himself, the Pentas were not notified by the facility. Dominic died of an overdose shortly thereafter. The Penta's sue for a multitude of civil law violations. Update: In May 2015 attorney Ryan A Hamilton was added as co-council on this case.

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Complaint to BBB, Narconon Gulf Coast, April 5, 2013

This couple was initially impressed by the advertised success rate of 90% when searching for addiction treatment for their son. Son complained about scientology teachings at Narconon Gulf Coast while under their care. At the same time, Narconon admitted they were having difficulty detoxing the client, but didn't hesitate to request another payment of $20, 000 before dropping him off at a motel with little to no resources. The family requested a partial refund to arrange for their son's treatment at another location, but Narconon refused. Sadly, their son died of an overdose shortly thereafter.

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Gore v. Narconon Gulf Coast, Debbie Ross

These are the original and later amended complaints filed by Mr. & Mrs. Gore of NY, against Narconon Gulf Coast, Inc. in Destin, FL and Debbie Ross, administrator, for misrepresentations of the program when they found out they had just sent their relative, a Jew, to a Scientology based program. Narconon failed to disclose to the Gores the fact that it is connected with the so-called "Scientology" church or movement. When confronted by the Gores that this was unacceptable, Narconon Gulf Coast administrator Debbie Ross, replied "I understand the family's concerns and I do not want a problem. If [patient] leaves the program, we will prorate the fee." The Gores never received the refund.

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Narconon Suncoast in Spring Hill, Florida

This man paid $27,000 for services to be delivered by Suncoast Rehab for his wife, but was never told of the connection to Scientology or L. Ron Hubbard, the founder of Scientology. He removed his wife from the center after 7 days, and considers that was 7 days too late. He is incredulous that such conditions and treatment can exist in the US, and was seeking a lawyer.

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Sold on Holistic Clinical Rehab, Got Scientology Instead

The brother of a former client alleges that Sun Coast Rehab failed to provide a safe and honest clinical drug rehabilitation, as promised. Facility employees denied any connection with scientology, but threw L. Ron Hubbard's "ethics" book at his sister when she voiced a desire to leave. He is convinced that all Narconon facilities are a front for scientology.

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