Knoflick v. Narconon of Northern California d/b/a Redwood Cliffs; ABLE; Narconon International; et.al.

The plaintiffs in this lawsuit allege breach of contract, fraud, negligence, intentional infliction of emotional distress, civil RICO for mail and wire fraud, negligent misrepresentation, negligence per se, breach of implied covenant of good faith and fair dealing, and seek injunctive relief under the California Unfair Competition Act related to deceptive and unlawful business practices.

Read more »

McClure v. v. Narconon Fresh Start d/b/a Rainbow Canyon Retreat; ABLE; Narconon International; et. al.

Plaintiff spoke to Dan Carmichael, who falsely promised him that Rainbow Retreat Canyon was an appropriate facility for his son. He said that he would would be under the care of licensed medical professionals, would receive extensive counseling for substance abuse from highly trained addictions counselors, that the success rate for Fresh Start was over 76%, that Fresh Start’s sauna detoxifying program would reduce or eliminate his drug cravings, and that the program was secular and didn't involve the practice or study of any religion. The son left Fresh Start in worse condition than he had entered because he did not feel safe and the program bore no resemblance to what Plaintiffs had been promised. Plaintiff paid $33,000.00 for his son to study Scientology.

Read more »

Levy v. Narconon Fresh Start d/b/a/ A Life Worth Saving; ABLE; Narconon International

Plaintiff entered the Narconon program receive help for an addiction to painkillers he developed after severely injuring his back as a ski instructor. He was told that Narconon offered standard cognitive behavioral therapy, and that the program was in no way involved the practice of any religion. He was was alarmed by strange treatments such as patients being made to scream at ashtrays, and the lack of any medical supervision. A counselor who was providing "touch assists", allegedly to help patients to relax, grabbed his crotch. The plaintiff was horrified, and soon after decided to leave Narconon. However, Narconon physically coerced him to stay on the property, until he finally persuaded them to let him leave. He was not allowed to take any of his personal effects that he had brought with him, including cash and credit cards. Narconon drove him to and left him at a homeless shelter, where he was forced to make his way home, several hours away. Unfortunately, once he arrived home, he found that Narconon had lied to his wife and told her not to allow him into his home and he was forced to involve police to gain entry to his own home. Afterwards, he required counseling due to post traumatic stress disorder, and, unable to copy with the trauma, he attempted to take his own life and required hospitalization. He is now working to rebuild his life.

Read more »

Winchell v. Narconon Fresh Start d/b/a Rainbow Canyon Retreat; ABLE; Narconon International; et. al.

False promises were made by Tonya Lawson, a Fresh Start employee, to Plaintiffs about the treatment their son would receive, and persuaded the plaintiff to enroll her son in the program. Because the plaintiff did not have the upfront fee of $32,500, Ms. Lawson arranged for the plaintiff to open new credit card accounts to pay the fee. The son was taken to the "Treehouse" area of the facility for detox where he became very ill and began suffering from seizures and had to be taken to the emergency room. There were no doctors or nurses at the detox facility or at the treatment facility as had been promised. After several days in the hospital, the son returned to begin treatment. When he realized that he was receiving Scientology indoctrination instead of substance abuse treatment, he escaped from the facility and walked 8 miles from the remote facility to Caliente, Nevada. During the walk, he was forced to drink from streams to avoid dehydration.

Read more »

Yates and Pugh v. Narconon Fresh Start d/b/a Rainbow Canyon Retreat; ABLE; Narconon International; et. al.

Plaintiffs were promised by Dan Carmichael and "Ryan" that their daughter would have extensive substance abuse treatment and counseling from qualified counselors with a greater than 76% success rate, that Fresh Start's sauna program, New Life Detoxification, would reduce or eliminate her drug cravings by flushing residual drug toxins stored in her fatty tissue, and that she would be under the supervision of licensed medical professionals, including licensed physicians and nurses. Carmichael and Ryan falsely represented to Dean that the Fresh Start program was secular and did not involve the study or practice of any religion. None of these things turned out to be true, and the daughter left early because she was not receiving any actual addiction treatment. She relapsed almost immediately, and plaintiffs incurred expenses to get Beret the treatment Defendants promised to provide, as well as help for the injuries Defendants’ “treatment” caused her.

Read more »

Jones and Ramirez v. Narconon Redwood Cliffs, Narconon International, ABLE, et. al.

Plaintiff searched the internet and found a purportedly independent referral website whose representative told her to contact Mike DiPalma at Redwood Cliffs. DiPalma misrepresented the program's success rate, medical and counselor staffing, effectiveness of the New Life Detoxification (sauna) as being “scientifically and medically proven.” The contract Plaintiff signed warranted that the program was not religious in nature, and did not mention Scientology. Feeling unsafe, and not getting drug rehab treatment, but Scientology instead, Plaintiff's son Jimmy left Narconon with other patients, walked into town, found lodging, and made plans to return home. Narconon staff "camped outside their hotel room, followed them around town, and repeatedly harassed Jimmy and the other patients. Jimmy and the others were forced to ask local police to get NNC staff to leave them alone."

Read more »