Formal Reports

A researched report made by an academic body, government agency, or other researcher on any Narconon center, or on the Narconon program as a whole. This type of information will usually cite sources for statements made.

A Brief Summary and Evaluation of the Evidence Base for Narconon as Drug Prevention Intervention

This brief report (“hasteoppdrag”) was commissioned by the national health authority, the Norwegian Directorate of Health, with an aim to provide a summary and evaluation of the evidence base for Narconon as drug prevention intervention. This report was a "study of studies". Researchers could locate only six studies that presented data about Narconon as a drug prevention intervention. They reported: "Five of these studies were non-experimental. Collectively, the studies presented in this brief report document lack of evidence for Naconon's effectiveness in drug prevention. Moreover, some of these published works raise concern about the theoretical and practical difference between Narconon and the Church of Scientology. Presently, there appears to exist no reliable evidence for using resources to support Narconon. Large scale and rigorous research about the program is needed."

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Comment on “Persistent organic pollutants in 9/11 world trade center rescue workers: Reduction following detoxification”

The same detoxification method as Narconon uses was used in a program for 9-11 Rescue Workers, but instead was called by the name the Church of Scientology uses, “Purification”. A study on this program was done by James Dahlgren, Marie Cecchini, Harpreet Takhar, and Olaf Paepke called "Persistent organic pollutants in 9/11 world trade center rescue workers: Reduction following detoxification." The study is cited by Narconon as proof that their method works as advertised, however in addition to the fact that Marie Cecchini is a Scientologist and therefore hardly an unbiased researcher, there were a number of other problems with the study. This is a refutation of the study, in the form of a Letter to the Editor by Edmund A.C. Crouch and Laura C. Green of Cambridge Environmental Inc. in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

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Narconon Credibility Investigation

In 2006, Narconon wanted to open a facility on Bouquet Canyon Road in Leona Valley, California. They applied for a Conditional Use Permit for the property and a hearing was held before Los Angeles County Regional Planning, using their Warner Springs facility, also known as Sunshine Summit Lodge, as a point of comparison. Residents were opposed to the facility, and Narconon representatives attended a Leona Valley Town Council Meeting to answer questions from the community. An investigation into statements made by Narconon representatives in regard to this planned facility was made, and a number of the statements conflicted with official documents from the State of California. The proposed Leona Valley Narconon was defeated, based on the findings of the investigation.

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Evaluation of the Narconon Drug Abuse Prevention Program, prepared for the California Department of Education

Narconon offered an anti-drug program to public schools in California. A series of articles in the San Francisco Chronicle beginning on June 9, 2004, resulted in California school officials investigating Narconon's claims. The study found that Narconon's program did not reflect medically and scientifically based practices and that it offered students misleading information about drug use and abuse. As a result of the investigation, on February 23, 2005, the state's superintendent of public instruction, Jack O'Connell, officially recommended that all schools in the state reject the Narconon program.

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Prof. Folke Sjoqvist’s Report – Expert advice on Narconon given to the Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare

Professor Folke Sjoqvist, the scientific advisor to the Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare, makes a statement regarding the detoxification program for drug addicts by the use of, among other things, vitamins and sauna that is practiced within Narconon, and answers the following questions: 1. Can this method of detoxification be considered to conform to scientific standards and medical experience? 2. Could this method risk the health of the client? 3. Could this method lead to permanent damage? 4. Should this program be prohibited? 5. May medical doctors prescribe the stated doses of vitamins; if so, on what indications?

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Board of Mental Health, State of Oklahoma on Narconon-Chilocco Oklahoma

In reviewing the application (for certification) and determining the merits of the application the Board on the October 18, 1991 and December 13, 1991 hearings heard evidence and considered the issues of safety and effectiveness of the treatment modality utilized by the Applicant (Narconon-Chiloco). The Board concluded that the program offered by Narconon-Chilocco is not medically safe. Certification was denied.

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James J. Kenney, Ph.D., R.D. of the National Council Against Health Fraud

This letter was written by Dr. James J. Kenney, Ph.D., R.D. of the National Council Against Health Fraud to Dr. John Chelf, a psychiatrist who specializes in addiction, and who was responsible for compiling a 1991 report to the Oklahoma Board of Mental Health and Substance Abuse when the Narconon Chilocco facility was under scrutiny by the state. Dr. Kenney is a Nutritional Research Specialist and Educator for the Pritikin Longevity Center + Spa, and speaks at conferences about unscientific nutritional claims.

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William B. Svoboda, M.D. to Robert W. Lobsinger

In this letter from William B. Svoboda, M.D. to Robert W. Lobsinger, Dr. Svoboda addresses the lack of real science in the Narconon approaches and the lack of safety and possible dangers of following the program. He lists the results of excessive vitamin doses, and refers to the vitamin use as dietary or nutritional "fadism", and the "megavitamin myth". He states: "Basically Hubbard's theories in general are just that - theories without controlled proof. He flings facts around wildly in excess, i.e., to drown the reader in facts in order to convince them that he knows, but he has little to reference and document the facts. A review of Hubbard's communications is that these directives are only theoretical observations without substantiating facts or details and with no reference for the reader to 'check the source out.'"

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Mark Palmer. M.D., Doctor of Internal Medicine

Dr. Mark Palmer, Doctor of Internal Medicine, and a previous Medical Director of two alcohol and drug rehabilitation units, wrote this letter concerning the Purification Rundown, which is identical to the Narconon Sauna Detoxification, to Robert W. Lobsinger, publisher of the Newkirk Herald Journal, for inclusion in the 1991 report by the Oklahoma Board of Mental Health and Substance Abuse on Narconon Chilocco. He states: "The Purification Rundown is somewhat patterned after many reputable detoxification programs in which diet, exercise, education and behavioral modification are used. But due to the above mentioned deficiencies as well as several outright untruths, I think that it is fair to say that the Purification Rundown is without merit."

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Bruce A. Roe, University of Oklahoma, Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry

Professor Roe reviewed documents concerning the Purification Rundown, which is identical to the Narconon Sauna Detoxification program from a biological point of view, to be submitted to the Oklahoma Board of Mental Health and Substance Abuse for their 1991 report on Narconon Chilocco. He concludes the report with this statement: "Overall the program proposed by Mr. Hubbard is pure unadulterated 'cow pies'. It is filled with some scientific truth but mainly is illogical and the conclusions drawn by Mr. Hubbard are without any basis in scientific fact."

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